Knitting!

I am, in theory, working part time at the moment. Which means time! perhaps even time for… knitting! I have a pattern and wool for self-striping socks which I bought in Montreal and haven’t touched since their purchase in June. Tonight may be the night.

Meanwhile, and just in case it isn’t, here’s something to inspire everyone… although whether or not with horror you must watch to decide. And also just because I’ve never put video on the blog before and I rather like the idea.

Every time I knit something one or more of my hairs becomes incorporated into the fabric without my intending it. However they have usually become detached from my scalp before rather than after this happens.

Lovely video link from Marja-Leena.

qarrtsiluni and the making of images

Hard to say, even harder to spell. But gorgeous to visit. It, qarrtsiluni, is a collaborative literary/artistic space/blog which invites contributions from the big wide world to its regularly-changing themes.

Why am I mentioning it now? Well, obviously, because I’ve just had something published there. And I’m really excited about it.

It’s a bit of a new departure for me, entirely inspired by the current editors, Dave Bonta and Beth Adams. For the previous theme, short shorts they asked me to submit an image in response to a piece of writing – Fish by Zhoen. So I did, and I’m reproducing it below. (I also, incidentally, contributed some words to that theme.)

skyfish

It’s my first attempt at both responding visually to someone else’s work and at making something rather than taking a straightforward picture. I’m still absurdly pleased with the result and use it as my avatar on all possible occasions even though for most purposes the image ends up so small as to be unreadable.

So right now the theme at qarrtsiluni is education and I was asked to respond to the most amazing piece of writing – Professor Lucifer in the Arena of Angels – by the poet Karl Elder.

You’ll see from reading it that it’s absolutely stuffed full of multi-layered images and meaning, and I had a brilliant time pulling stuff together. In fact most of the elements of the most recent image are from my recent holiday on the Island of Arran and Holy Isle. The brain (not a real one) was taken on my trip to Montreal earlier this year and the glorious darling Maizy who flies in triplicate across the sky did so originally on the beach in France last summer.

It would be so exciting if anybody else felt moved to make an image in response to that poem, or any other writing. Or, of course, contribute more words for image-makers to respond to! Details of how to contact the editors are here.

Minor White

erosion

My lovely friend T introduced me to the photographs of Minor White this evening, thinking I would find him sympa. Boy oh boy. Crazy name, crazy amazing guy. He’s taken all the pictures I want to take. Dammit. Look at this, for instance. Have I not striven for just that image? Sigh.

One of his students was John Daido Loori: Author, Artist, Zen Master, a photographer and painter who creates as part of his Zen practice. It’s fascinating to discover these two artists just as I am paying attention to and exploring what I increasingly see as the spiritual practice of looking (and photographing), and the parallels between this and recovering from mental ill health.

The picture of the rock above is from this summer in Arran. Minor White took something very similar, so similar I actually squeaked while going through T’s book.

Most exciting of all? She was one of his students herself. We’re going to have to have a long, long child-free session with several bottles of wine one evening very soon.

Update – to be strictly accurate she was the student of one of his students. A second-generation Minor, as it were.

Watercolour

canal watercolour 1

I love the colours in the water of the canal, as seen by photoshop. This is a picture of the red pillar of a building reflected in the Grand Union Canal. Ask the digital imaging programme to adjust the levels and this is what you get. Such beautiful shades, squiggly lines, swirling textures.

There are other pictures from this afternoon’s walk on flickr.

Time passes

anenome

Pretty isn’t always perfect. Or vice versa. At least so I like to think. Which is a roundabout way of introducing the sort-of incorporation of the previous incarnation.

Thanks to the ingenious brain of Mr Hg, much cappuccino and vast slices of very good carrot cake at the local wi-fi-ery, there are now archives dating back to the primordial sludge that was the inception of frizzyLogic, over there in the left-hand sidebar.

There’s nothing as complicated as a content management system or even a database since all that sort of useful stuff was destroyed. It’s a series of static html pages cunningly attempting to give the impression of a continuum. And there are very few images because of course the flickr account is gone beyond recall. But it’s better than a poke in the eye with the proverbial.

The Tripoli Six

From Declan Butler, a reporter with the prestigious international science journal Nature, a reminder of the appalling case of the five nurses and a doctor facing the death penalty in Libya.

The six were found guilty of deliberately causing the infection of more than 400 children in hospital with the HIV virus after confessions which they say were obtained during torture. Testimony from international scientific experts as to their innocence has been ignored. They have already been in held in prison for seven years.

Declan has written an article detailing the latest stages of the women’s retrial (requires free registration, or try BugMeNot) in which activists involved with the case appeal for international mobilisation.

There is also an editorial which calls for action:

International diplomacy, dealing as it does with geopolitical and economic realpolitik, by necessity often involves turning a blind eye. But its lack of progress in response to the medics’ case in Libya is an affront to the basic democratic principles that the United States and the European Union espouse. Diplomacy has lamentably failed to deliver.

For anyone interested in writing a letter to Libyan Ambassador in their country about this issue, expressing concern and asking for it to be conveyed to the authorities in Libya, there is a list of addresses of Libyan embassies on the left hands side of this page.

An awarding prospect

UPDATEwe won!!

Global Voices is up for a prestigious (and remunerative) award. The ceremony is underway as I type, in Washington DC.

It’s great to sit in a rather grey London, fighting off the fighting cat and dog, chatting with the team there by IM and marveling at the ability of my colleague Georgia to both be there, chat to me, mingle with the great and the good, take pictures and liveblog – all at the same time!

Good luck team! Although Georgia at least seems pretty optimistic: “If sexiness is one of the criteria, GV may have a slight advantage here.”

Couldn’t agree more!

Stone tower

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stone tower, originally uploaded by turn toward the light.

This is testing the “blog this” facility from flickr.

The picture was taken on my recent holiday to the Island of Arran.

This is the drawback to this method of posting – tedious to make links. And I suppose the category will be set to the default.

I wonder what it will look like.